Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 64

Thread: U.S. aircraft in the Philippines, 1937-1942

  1. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    W. Washington
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    The P-35A was an export version of the Army's standard P-35. A slightly bigger engine, another .50 caliber gun in each wing and a few other modifications. Although a little more manuverable than the P-40, they were no match for the Zero is several categories. The ones not shipped to the Philippines or Sweden were used as advanced trainers.

    I mentioned there was a compartment that in a pinch, could hold a passenger. One of the surviving P-35s flew from Bataan to Cebu, which, at the time, was still held by the Americans. The officer meeting the plane was amazed to see no one but TWO passengers crawl out of the compartment - PLUS another person riding on the pilot's lap!! Talk about claustrophobia!!



    Another interesting story was during the pre-war period. The 17th PS had a monkey as a mascot and one of the pilots (apparently not the one with the highest i.q.!) took the monkey on a flight with him. The monkey was NOT taken with flight and the pilot was lucky to land the plane!!


  2. #17
    Pacific Historian syscom3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    12,315
    Post Thanks / Like
    You have any information on the naval aircraft there?

    I dont suspect anything but PBY's....... but since this was a backwater in pre war years, the navy must have had some ancient planes in service.
    "Pilot to copilot..... what are those mountain goats doing up here in the clouds?"

  3. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    W. Washington
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    You're correct - mostly PBYs of Patrol Wing 10 (PatWing 10) - however, there were a few others. OS2Us, a couple of SOCs and J2Fs. One J2F was sunk as it lay moored. It was raised, repaired and became "The Candy Clipper", carrying supplies, medicines passengers and (yes) candy to Bataan and Corregidor from Cebu. The night Bataan fell, it carried several passengers out of Bataan.

    If you want to read a good book on this subject, read In the Hands of Fate: The Story of PatWing 10 by Dwight Messimer. It may be out of print but may be available in libraries on used. Great book.
    Last edited by Rick the Librarian; 01-29-2007 at 02:49 PM.

  4. #19
    Senior Member renrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montrose, Colorado
    Posts
    4,542
    Post Thanks / Like
    Really good stuff, youall. I also enjoy material about the early days in the Pacific. I understand that Tex Hill is still living in San Antonio.

  5. #20
    Senior Member renrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montrose, Colorado
    Posts
    4,542
    Post Thanks / Like
    I believe there were some Beechcraft UC-43s in the Philipines when war broke out.

  6. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    47
    Post Thanks / Like
    Some trivia regarding the pictures. The B-17D shown at Iba was the one that
    Colin Kelly brought out from Hawaii, though not the one he was shot down in
    (a C model). "61" was badly damaged at Clark on Dec. 8th, and was rebuilt and flown by the Japanese along with 2 E models captured in Java. The P-35A
    in metal finish 17/4MP was Wagner's ship. I met a number of 17th Pursuit vets
    on a trip with them to the PI in 2002 for the 60th anniversary of the fall of Bataan. They said Wagner was quite a character, and lived up to the image.

  7. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    W. Washington
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    Good answers - I'm especially impressed by the guy who recognized the A-27s!! They were "beefed up" AT-6s that were designed as light attack planes and destined for Thailand. They were intercepted on the Manila docks and used as hacks and trainers.

    I recognized #61 from some captured Japanese photos. Here's one taken by the Japanese when they captured Nichols Field. You can see a couple of P-35A wrecked in the foreground.



    Someone mentioned B-18s - 12 were sent to the Philippines for the 28th BS in early 1941 but they were soon used as transports. Some B-10s were still around, as well. This was serving as a hack with the 4th Composite Group HQ. Taken at Nichols Field, 1941.


  8. #23
    Senior Member wingnutz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    233
    Post Thanks / Like
    wow...amazing info rick...

    thanks for these images...

    would greatly appreciate it if you have any more photos of actual PAAC aircraft during the advent of ww2 in the philippines???

    i'm particularly interested in verifying the actual clor schemes on the aircraft handed over to the PAAC like the B-3, P-26, B-10, O-49...

    thanks again...

  9. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like

    Article on the Pilipino Peashootin' pighter pilots =)

    Hey guys, found this article on the web, posted by a Mr. Rob Arndt. It's an excerpt from the memoirs of Capt. Jesus Villamor. So far this is what I've gathered from my limited research on the web of the 6th Pursuit Squadron.

    Jesus Villamor and the P-26 Against the Japanese - rec.aviation.military | Google Groups

    Known members:

    CPT Jesus Villamor, MOV - Victories: 1x Mitsubishi A6M Zero destroyed (12/10/41), 1x Mitsubishi G3M "Nell" bomber destroyed (12/12/41). He later joined the Allies as an Intelligence officer and worked closely with Gen. MacArthur.
    LT Godofredo Juliano - He was the first to take off during the Dec. 10th battle, and provided air cover for the rest of the group during their takeoff.
    LT Jose Gozar - Reportedly not a member of 6PS, but took off to help on Dec. 10th even though his P-26 was unarmed. He fought in Bataan and Corrigedor, and was later captured by the Japanese and presumed dead.
    LT Cesar Basa - First Filipino pilot to be KIA. Shot down 12/12/41 and was strafed by the Japanese during either his parachute descent or when he was trying to flee on foot.
    LT Alberto Aranzaso - Not mentioned in the excerpt. He was one of the pilots who took off on Dec. 10th. He later was killed in Corrigedor while trying to escape captivity along with an American officer, MAJ Damon Gause.
    LT Antonio Mondigo - Survived the Bataan Death March, and later joined the Allies as an Intelligence officer.
    LT Geronimo Aclan - Survived the Bataan Death March, and later joined Filipino guerrillas in raiding the Japanese, and liberating American POW camps.
    LT Manuel Conde - Survived the war to become a pretty successful actor, director, and producer in the Philippines.

    There is presumably at least one or two (and maybe more?) reported victories by Filipino pilots including a Zero, although these are unconfirmed, and have not found any credible source stating these victories (as you can imagine the difficulty in researching history on Filipino pilots).

    Cheers,
    GC

  10. #25
    Senior Member Capt. Vick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Posts
    4,658
    Post Thanks / Like
    Hey Rick!

    Great stuff! Thanks for posting!

    Hey do you have any guess on which P-35 (marking wise I mean) was the one that was credited with shooting down a zero? Also, I noticed from the pictures in "Doomed from the start" that not all P-35's had the window in the door. Any info on which did or didn't and why?

    look forward to more!

    Regards
    “The entrance to the cockpit of this aircraft is most difficult. It should have been made impossible.” — Flight Journal magazine, April 2000, regards the XF10F-1, Grumman's first attempt at a swing wing fighter.
    EDIT: I have been informed by REDCOAT that the same "quote was first used by a test pilot for the British, Blackburn B-26 Botha ( a very unloved aircraft) in 1938" - Thanks amigo!

    "Death doesn't ask..."

  11. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    45
    Post Thanks / Like
    Can anybody recall details on the first kamikaze attack of WW2 when a B-17 pilot dived his aircraft into a Japanese warship during japan's conquest of the Philippines?

  12. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    47
    Post Thanks / Like

    B-17

    Quote Originally Posted by Propellorhead View Post
    Can anybody recall details on the first kamikaze attack of WW2 when a B-17 pilot dived his aircraft into a Japanese warship during japan's conquest of the Philippines?
    It never happend. Purely a propagandized version of Colin Kelley's demise.

    Duane

  13. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Do you have anay info on Patwing ten

  14. #29
    Senior Member buffnut453's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia, US of A
    Posts
    1,768
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. Vick View Post
    Hey do you have any guess on which P-35 (marking wise I mean) was the one that was credited with shooting down a zero? Also, I noticed from the pictures in "Doomed from the start" that not all P-35's had the window in the door. Any info on which did or didn't and why?
    Nothing like resurrecting an ancient thread...

    AFAIK there's precious little info on the identity of specific P-35A airframes involved in the fighting for the Philippines. As for the fuselage window, all the P-35As were fitted with it. I suspect the windows on some aircraft were overpainted when the OD/NG camo was applied - this is just a hunch but it makes sense. I guess it is possible that some aircraft had the window replaced with sheet metal. Again, no rhyme or reason to these changes.

    The one aspect I find interesting is the mix of markings on the P-35As. Some of the camo'd airframes wore national markings on just the upper and lower wing surfaces (both wings, both surfaces), while others had the more normal port upper surface/starboard lower surface marking. Finally, some aircraft had national markings on the fuselage (and, again, there was apparently a mix of wing markings associated with these aircraft). Then we have the unit codes which appear in both black and white on the fins of different aircraft...and the different shades of cowlings. Overall, for such a small contingent of aircraft, the marking variations are considerable.

  15. #30
    Senior Member oldcrowcv63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Northeast North Carolina
    Posts
    1,865
    Post Thanks / Like
    Don't forget to include Capt. Bud Sprague in the list of fallen P-40 pilot heroes at the war's start. Companion book to Doomed at the Start is Bartsch's Every Day a Nightmare describing the Java campaign of the 17th Provisional Pursuit Squadron. Sprague was evidently a Group staff officer in the PI who flew some combat missions. He was evacuated to Australia and became CO of the 17th. He was, by all acccounts a great combat leader, and was KIA. That episode of the war might provide a clue as to what might have happened in the PI after December 8, 1941 had the units been blessed with better leadership and preparation.
    Last edited by oldcrowcv63; 03-15-2012 at 11:29 AM.
    None of us is as smart as all of us...

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •