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Thread: Metal Mosquito

  1. #46
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    Here is (what I assume to be) an all metal aircraft of similar size to the Mosquito.

    It is lighter, but also has lighter engines and does not have radiators etc.


  2. #47
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    I have thought about a 'metal Mosquito' a number of times. Not so much for Europe, more for in the southwest Pacific or tropical Africa. I recall the Hornet was used used in Malaysia in the late 40s, but I don't think a Mosquito or the DH Hornet are the best fit for the hot moist tropics. Tropics + wood = rot and termite damage = bad for wood airplanes.

    My though for a 'metal Mosquito' would be the Ju 188S/T and/or the Ju 388K/L. A Ju 388K with a pair of Griffons or or a pair of Sabres done up with annular radiators as 'power eggs' might be interesting.

    I am now closing the blast doors. That vein in Readie's forehead looks like it is going to burst.

    Piper106

  3. #48
    Senior Member yulzari's Avatar
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    You know Piper106 (tongue in cheek) I doubt if the Luftwaffe would let the RAF have any of their aeroplanes; even if asked very nicely....

    So no Ju88/188/388 will address the RAF's bombing strategy question.

    De Havilland plywood/balsa is not subject to insect damage. The Hornet and Mosquito (and Vampire for that matter) served in tropics and at sea so temperature and damp were not an issue either. Now, if you neglect the waterprooofing fabric outer wrapping, then you will see a problem. This is why abandoned surplus ones rotted out.

  4. #49
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    The early Mosquitos had a problem with the glue going mouldy inside the fuselage in tropical conditions. This was fixed for later aircraft. IIRC.
    These are my principles, if you don't like them I have others. (Groucho Marx)

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  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PJay View Post
    The early Mosquitos had a problem with the glue going mouldy inside the fuselage in tropical conditions. This was fixed for later aircraft. IIRC.
    Yes, the glue was changed after problems in the tropics.

    Not sure if it went "mouldy" or just lost its bonding capabilities and thus compromised structural strength.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzak View Post
    Here is (what I assume to be) an all metal aircraft of similar size to the Mosquito.

    It is lighter, but also has lighter engines and does not have radiators etc.
    It also lacks performance, range and bomload. I can't think of any reason why a country post war would build an aircraft which is already out classed by any A20 from 6 years earlier. Unless to get a national aircraft industry going

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by rank amateur View Post
    It also lacks performance, range and bomload. I can't think of any reason why a country post war would build an aircraft which is already out classed by any A20 from 6 years earlier. Unless to get a national aircraft industry going
    The performance would have been similar to the Mosquito had the Merlins been available.

  8. #53
    IP/Mech THE GREAT GAZOO FLYBOYJ's Avatar
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    Folks, I'll say it again. Wood does not do well when you take the aircraft out of it's construction environment and expose it to extreme changes in temperatures and humidity. The glue problem on the Mosquito was solved but temperature related problem plagued many wood aircraft and the Mosquito was no exception.

    "First located at Ekron (Tel-Nof) AFB, the Mosquitoes quickly moved to Hazor where the 109th Mosquito squadron was formed, comprising of three sections : operational, training and reconnaissance. A fourth section for night fighting was set up with the arrival of the Mk. 30s in 1952. The large number of aircraft received exceeded the storage room available at Hazor and the Mosquitoes were parked in the sun. This wrecked havoc on the wooden aircraft and many malfunctioned until shelters were build for the entire Mosquito force."

    the mosquito in israeli service

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLYBOYJ View Post
    Folks, I'll say it again. Wood does not do well when you take the aircraft out of it's construction environment and expose it to extreme changes in temperatures and humidity. The glue problem on the Mosquito was solved but temperature related problem plagued many wood aircraft and the Mosquito was no exception.

    "First located at Ekron (Tel-Nof) AFB, the Mosquitoes quickly moved to Hazor where the 109th Mosquito squadron was formed, comprising of three sections : operational, training and reconnaissance. A fourth section for night fighting was set up with the arrival of the Mk. 30s in 1952. The large number of aircraft received exceeded the storage room available at Hazor and the Mosquitoes were parked in the sun. This wrecked havoc on the wooden aircraft and many malfunctioned until shelters were build for the entire Mosquito force."

    the mosquito in israeli service
    Unfortunately the report does not specify what "malfunctions" were. To me a malfunction is something that happens to mechanical systems, like an engine, or control rods. If it were a problem for the airframe I would expect to see the word "failure".

    The report also says:
    The night fighter Mosquitoes, the NF Mk. 30s, also suffered a great deal from the local weather. Delievered devoid of their radars, these aircraft were fitted with the American APS-4 naval radar and wore a black livery. In 1953 they formed the IAF's first night fighter squadron but the poor performance shown by the new radars, the poor maintenance and the corrosive local weather hampered their operation.
    But it again does not say how they suffered.

  10. #55
    IP/Mech THE GREAT GAZOO FLYBOYJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzak View Post
    But it again does not say how they suffered.
    Having worked on wood aircraft I could bet dollars to donuts they had shrinkage. I've seen other reports about post war Mosquitoes having issues in the field, I'll have to find them

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLYBOYJ View Post
    Having worked on wood aircraft I could bet dollars to donuts they had shrinkage. I've seen other reports about post war Mosquitoes having issues in the field, I'll have to find them
    Causing deformation of the airframe/wings?

  12. #57
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    The current holy grail of warbird restoration is an airworthy de Havilland Mosquito, one of the very last of the major World War II types not represented by a flying restoration or accurate replica. Mosquitos were once plentiful, but other than the 30-odd parked in museums and non-flying displays, all have succumbed to the inevitable deterioration of their wood airframes and, particularly, the glue used to fabricate them. The last flying example crashed fatally at an airshow in Manchester, England, in July 1996.

    Mosquito to Buzz Again

    Boom - headshot!

    It should be easy to build a wooden airplane, right? EAAers do it all the time. Actually, it would be a far simpler restoration if Mosquitos were aluminum, for a big part of the job consists of building the large fuselage molds, the tooling and the extremely precise wing and attachment jigs that must be in place before a rebuild can really begin. All of de Havilland's jigs and tools had been scrapped in the early 1950s, so the Mosquito literally had to be reinvented.
    Last edited by FLYBOYJ; 04-11-2012 at 08:49 PM.

  13. #58
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    Causing deformation, separation, warping, and outright failure under normal load.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzak View Post
    Causing deformation of the airframe/wings?
    No, any metal fittings attached into the wood structure becomes loose because the wood is shrinking. I seen on Pitts bi-planes that were brought into California from colder climates.

    Glued components can and will seperate

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzak View Post
    Here is (what I assume to be) an all metal aircraft of similar size to the Mosquito.

    It is lighter, but also has lighter engines and does not have radiators etc.
    The Calquin was also wood, and about 100 mph slower than the Mosquito.

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