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What happened to the Axis planes after WW2?

Aviation Discuss What happened to the Axis planes after WW2? in the World War II - Aviation forums; ...

  1. #16
    Banned Soren's Avatar
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    Senior Member Thorlifter's Avatar
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    I read on Wiki where the Do-335 sits they also have other "unique late-war German aircraft such as the only known example of the Arado Ar 234B-2 Blitz jet recon-bomber, and the only surviving Heinkel He 219A Uhu"

    Hell, it would be worth going just to see these three planes.

  3. #18
    Banned Soren's Avatar
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    The Ar-234 is right behind the Do-335 in the pic I presented above

  4. #19
    Benevolens Magister Airframes's Avatar
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    It really is a shame that so many types, not just axis, were scrapped after the war. But, I suppose after more than five years of war, the last thing on people's minds was the preservation of aircraft for history.
    Sadly, it's still happening now. About four or five years ago, I was amazed, and slightly puzzled, to see a Tornado F3 in the museum at Duxford. This aircraft was/is a type still in service with the R.A.F., so my immediate reaction was 'What's it doing here?!' But at least it shows that some people have the foresight to preserve current, or soon to be out of service, aircraft types for future generations. It might mean very little, today, to see a modern jet in a museum, but in 50 or 60 years time, it'll be the equivalent, to the generation then, of us seeing, for example, a Spitfire or Mustang.
    Let's hope this practice continues, although it really is a shame that at least one of all types weren't preserved at the end of the war - it'd be nice to have a Stirling, a Dornier 17, Whirlwind etc.





  5. #20
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    Some of the 262s were flown at Seymour, Indiana, right up the road from me, here in Louisville, KY. They did a LOT of flight testing after the war in little Seymour. I knew nothing about it until going to a gunshow in the National Guard Armory there, and saw a bunch of old photos on the wall while waiting to go in. There's still an airfield there, though it's no longer used by the Guard, it's now the commercial airport.

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    Senior Member GrauGeist's Avatar
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    I agree Terry, it's a real shame some of the rarer types didn't somehow survive, like a He280 or some of the Allied limited runs or prototypes. Then again, it wouldn't have been all that practical to have saved a Me264 or a B-19 after the war, so recycling claimed 'em

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    Senior Member beaupower32's Avatar
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    I think I will be sad for the rest of the night due to that photo of all the planes that are all trashed. What I wouldnt do to get my hands on one, even if it wasnt flight worthy.


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  8. #23
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    The french Air Force used german planes for quite a while during and after WW2.

    In 1945 a french squadron of captured JU 88 was used to help reduce the pocket of "Fortress Royan" on the Atlantic coast.
    German camo with white stripes on wings and french roundels.

    Just after WW2 transport airplane were DC3 and JU52. The SNCASO had a production line for the JU and it was called "Toucan". It was used extensively in Indochina for transport, paradrops and... bombing.

    As well the Fieseler Storch was used in Indochina.

    All my documentation is in France and I now live in the US, I just rely on memory. It could be another company than SNCASO. Immediate post WW2 was a mess in France.

    I know they tried to use FW190 in operation and it failed rapidly because of lack of spares.
    And in Indochina they used some left japanese planes also !

    Fascinating forum by the way !


    G.
    Last edited by zoul310; 07-05-2009 at 05:55 PM.

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    Luftwaffe Aircraft

    The RAF set up Air Disarmament units whose sole role was to follow the front line units,and to take away totally the Luftwaffe's capability to fight, as an airfield was captured they would go in and assess what aircraft and equipment was found. They had a number of specific targets to look for , jet fighters, rocket fighters etc and any thing that showed interesting scientific developments.

    Any aircraft that were not required at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough were scrapped on site, a lot were blown up, others were cut up by ground personnel, others were bulldosed etc, the remains being sent for scrap or buried on site.

    Most of the aircraft that were sent to the RAE were left out in open storage at various locations, RAF Sealand in Cheshire being one and during the very bad Winter of 1947 they suffered very badly due to the weather and most were scrapped, others were used in training exercises by station Fire crews.

    I did hear that an aircraft factory in Chicago was used as as a storage facility for a lot of captured material, but when the Korean war broke out, the factory was re-commissioned and all the captured equipment was scrapped.

    Russia is believed to have a very large number of Luftwaffe aircraft lying undiscovered in remote locations and lakes, and a large number of aircraft are believed to lie in European lakes, only time,money and resources will tell.

  10. #25
    IP/Mech THE GREAT GAZOO FLYBOYJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nachtjager View Post
    I did hear that an aircraft factory in Chicago was used as as a storage facility for a lot of captured material, but when the Korean war broke out, the factory was re-commissioned and all the captured equipment was scrapped.
    What factory was that?

  11. #26
    Member PJay's Avatar
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    The Spanish got a bunch of He-111's and Bf 109's. Re-engined with Merlins.
    This is my first post here, I guess this has been mentioned before but I haven't read the rest of the Board yet (LOL)
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    Senior Member imalko's Avatar
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    Spanish didn't got them, they build them themselves by licenced production and they used Merlin engines because the original DB and Jumo engines were in short supply.

    And by the way welcome to the forum PJay.
    Last edited by imalko; 08-22-2009 at 05:37 PM.


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  13. #28
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    Now Japanese planes and wrecks stayed on some islands in the Pacific for some time after the war...Ssome whole ..Untell some years later they came back with scrap ships and halled it all back home ..

  14. #29
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    Hi, my first post,

    I have always been wondered about what happened to Axis aircraft after the war, so googled it and found this excellent forum.

    I have just been watching a 1953 British film called They Who Dare and it showed a group of soldeirs blowing up an airfield full of Savoia Marchetti SM.79's. What was interesting was the credits said thanks to the Lebonese Air Force, so I guess some of the planes could have ended up in the Middle East.

    Don't worry, when they blew up it was clear they were models.
    Last edited by Beefy103; 02-25-2012 at 11:30 AM.

  15. #30
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    Weren't many destroyed by the Luftwaffe?

    As the Allied armies closed in, aircraft that were not able to fly (due to lack of fuel or other reasons) were detroyed so they would not fall into Allied hands.

    Certainly the case with some Do335s.

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