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Thread: Spanish Civil War: Republican Air Force (FARE)

  1. #76
    Banned VG-33's Avatar
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    Here's a picture of the captured Polenz's 6-15 aircraft.

    02.jpg

    With "Kostya Rozanoff" on commands, painted with republican colors. A russian, naturalised french but not soviet test-pilot. Went in spain early 1938 with Guy de Merle's mission.

    22.jpg

    Regards


  2. #77
    World Travelling Doctor? Gnomey's Avatar
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    Interesting shots!


    "Success is not Final, Failure is not Fatal, it is the Courage to Continue that Counts"
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    Enscription on Hugh Dowding's (AOC Fighter Command 1936-40) statue in London


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  3. #78
    Banned VG-33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gekho View Post
    During the war, the Republic captured at least 11 Fiat Cr.32; some of them were captured when the troops occupied anbandoned airfields, one more when its pilot deserted, three when italians pilots landed in enemy airfields and another one rebuilt at La Rabasa using wrecks. Two of these captured Fiat were sent to URSS to be evaluated, being later recovered by germans at the Kharkov university. The Cr.32 that stood in Spain were transfered to 71 Group, used to defend Alicante. One of these Fiats were later sent to El Carmoli Fighter School. The picture shows the republican ace Manuel Aguirre Lopez posing with the Fiat CX-001
    Frankly i don't know where and when republican troops advanced (that was pretty rare) and moreover occupied airfields with aircrafts on it. At least 10 airworthy Fiat CR-32 failed in republican hands: 8 by accidents, combat damages or mistakes, and 2 by desertors.

    Two were soon destroyed in accidents, 1 went to USSR, the others served within Grupo 71 de defensa de Costas. The CX-001 served for training of the 1st Mosca, in simulating dogfights.

    The first soviet captured Fiat was so damaged after a forced landing, that no attemps were maid for it's restoration in april, 1937.. The secund one was captured on Alcala de Henares airfield on june the 6th and supposingly offered by republicans to soviet union, from Arraez Cerda.
    This one was submitted to intensive trials from the 23th june to the end of august. It reached 329 km/h at SL and 341 at 2000 m only. Some 7-8% inferior to official italians specs, but it has some wear and was tested without wheel fairings. Normal loaded, it had a 1 984 kg weight. It was rather much compared to the I-15 (1370 - 1390) and the I-16 ( 1508 -1590) of its time. The power to weight ratio was also inferior. So the full turning circle was maid in 13.5 -15.5 s. A rather mediocre result. It took only 8-9s to the I-15, that could outmanoeuvre and outfight the italian plane with ease. And, only marginally better than last heavier I-16 with self sealing tanks and back armor, a device that CR-32 did not have.

    In vertical plan, it was even worse for the CR-32, except on step dives...

    In other hand, Fiat structure was considered as very rugged, the heavy 12.7 machine guns were allowing to open efficient fire from 300/400 m thus it was only 100 for ShKAS, the range was virtually twice longer than in soviet planes. Even if mainly considered as obsolete, there were founda lot of advanced technical solutions and other details that were later copied by soviet engeneers.

    Regards

    pic_90.jpg
    RU-CR32-BN1.gif
    Last edited by VG-33; 08-18-2010 at 07:56 AM.

  4. #79
    Banned VG-33's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by gekho View Post
    On July 17th 1936, a radio station in Morocco started broadcasting: "Above all Spain the cloudless sky". This phrase was a signal for the beginning of the fascist mutiny directed against the Spanish government. At the head of the revolt was general Francisco Franco, who had been a threat to the Spanish Republic. In the first few days it became possible to win the nationalists in larger part of the country as most of the population remained true to the government. However the fascist states, Italy and Germany, did not remain aside. They had started delivering Franco the newest arms: instruments, rifles, machine guns, fighters and bombers. Besides regular Italian infantry and aviation divisions participated in fights on the side of the rebels, the newly created "Condor Legion", a German air unit, started fighting as well. All this allowed the fascists to gain a number of victories over the army of the republicans that suffered from a shortage of arms and qualified officers. By November 1936, the nationalists were close to Madrid.

    Government aircraft were almost helpless against faster and more modern Heinkels, Fiats, Junkers and Savoias. Madrid was left open to a barbarous bombardment. The situation was desperate.

    England, France and the USA, being afraid that a victory by the republicans could induce Spain into becoming communist, conducted a policy of non-interference: they did not help the lawful government and influenced other states to do the same. Indignant of this connivance to the rebels, volunteers of many countries (the USA, France, England, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Germany and others) made their way to Spain to help in the fight. However, without modern weapons, their struggle against counterrevolution could not hope to stop the rebels.

    The Soviet Union decided to support the Spanish government in its struggle against fascism. To Spain there had gone the Soviet volunteers: pilots, tankmen, cavalrymen. From the end of October, 1936 the Soviet arms began to arrive.
    Ok.

    On November 4th, I-15 biplane fighters appeared.
    Not exactly , the 3th at evening.

    However because of the quantitative superiority of their opponents, they could not achieve any form of parity.
    Is it from reports, or just your own supposals?

    The Soviet government then decided to send their newest fighters, the I-16, to Spain. Among the cargo on the ship, "Kursk", which has arrived on October, 25, there were 16 I-16 type 5 fighters, with another 15 arriving the next day on the "Blagoev" ship.
    No; on October, 25, it had just left crimea ports. It reached spain on november, the 3 late in the cover of darkness.
    It's seems idiomatic (just not to say idiotic) to imagine that soviets decided then and not before any I-15 results, to send I-16 to Spain...I-16 was just the standard fighter in VV-S inventory in november 1936; 1 400 of them were produced, and more than 900 serving in active units in previous summer account. VV-S was just the sole air-force in the world to use high speed cantilever fighter monoplanes with (semetimes) enclosed canopy and retractable carriage for full 2.5-3 years long.
    So, it should have been absolutly abnormal, to not include them in the list of material send to spain.


    Together with the planes there were pilots from the 1st (Bryansk) air brigade, aviation gasoline, oil, ammunition, as well as some refuelers and autostarters.
    No. From the 83th fighter air brigade of the Briansk militar district.

    The pilots assembled in 3 squadrons under Captain Tarhov. In just 4 days after arriving the planes were assembled, tested and prepared for battle.
    This is rather true, but only for the first of them. Last assembled fighters did not reached Madrid sky until november, the 22th.

    Your pics should be better with comments:

    The first are I-16 tip 5 fighters of Baltic Fleet Air Arm. From a soviet 1939th film.

    Secund is a tampered with picture, by censorship and published in papers of that time. Not very valuable indeed.

    Third, is Ramon Castaneda a famous instructor at El Carmoli Escuela de Alta Velocidad (High speeds training school), in front of it's Mosca. He died some months later during training duties. The Mosca was a difficult, unforgiving, sometimes unstable and mainy dangerous plane to handle. Some republicans pilots as the frenchman William Labuissière (Ramon Ibanez) were later to claim that in Spain, there were as much Mosca losses by accident than by combat!

    All fotographs are from an illegal copy, in russian edition of this book:

    Polikarpov I-16
    Last edited by VG-33; 08-18-2010 at 07:58 AM.

  5. #80
    Senior Member gekho's Avatar
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    Lineas Aereas Postales Españolas (L.A.P.E)

    In 1929, Spain signed the Warsaw Convention, ratified four months later, on January 31, 1930. However, the consequences of the economic depression of 1929 made necessary that the state intervene to order the chaotic development of the first air links and prevent the failure of existing small companies. Thus, in 1929, Union Spanish Air, Iberia LAE, CETA and dirigibles Columbus Transaérea formed CLASSA (Concesionaria de Lineas Aereas Subsidiarias SA), whose name clearly shows his nature. However, the inadequate capitalization provided by partners CLASSA made necessary a contribution from the State, being CLASSA expropriated and their properties are transferred to a newly created corporation called LAPE (Spanish Airlines Postcards) at times of the Second Republic, with 55% of state capital. LAPE, which operated until the end of the civil war, held three different networks:

    - Peninsula, linking Seville, Valencia, Barcelona and Mallorca (through Barcerlona) in Madrid.

    - North African and Canary Islands, with the route-Madrid-Cape Juby Larache-Las Palmas.

    - European with links to Paris, Lisbon and Berlin.

    Shortly before the Spanish Civil War had a fleet of 18 aircraft. The basis of this fleet were the devices De Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide (8 seats) and Fokker F. VIIA / 3m tri-motor (15 seats). In addition, CASA cosntrucción contracted with two Dornier Do J Wal seaplanes similar to those used by the Spanish Military and Naval Aviation, a german tri-motor Junkers G-24. Later, when the war started, LAPE began to use all kind of airplenes, like some Douglas DC-1 and DC-2, four Spartan 7-W Executive, Northrop Delta, Airspeed Envoy, De Havilland Puss Moth, Ford 4-AT and many others.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -airspeed-6-envoy-jpg   -h7-jpg  

    -junkers-24-jpg   -lc-dc-1-ec-agn-lape-jpg  

    -lc-de-havilland-puss-moth-ec-cbc-lape-1-jpg   -lc-de-havilland-puss-moth-ec-cbc-lape-2-jpg  

    -lc-ford-4-ec-rra-republicano-jpg   -lc-ford-4-ec-rra-republicano-2-jpg  

    -northrop-delta-003-jpg   -spartan-jpg  

    -de-havilland-dh-89-dragon-rapide-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 09-11-2011 at 04:53 PM.

  6. #81
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    Fokker F.XX

    The Fokker F.XX was a 1930s Dutch three-engined airliner designed and built by Fokker. It was the first Fokker design to use an elliptical-section fuselage instead of the traditional square fuselage and the first Fokker aircraft with retractable landing gear. The F.XX was a high-wing thick-section cantilever monoplane with a retractable tailwheel landing gear. It was powered by three Wright Cyclone radial engines, one in the nose and one under each wing on struts. The main landing gear retracted into the engine nacelles. The F.XX registered PH-AIZ and named Zilvermeeuw (en: Silver Gull) first flew in 1933. It was delivered to KLM for services from Amsterdam to London and Berlin. Although the F.XX was a more advanced design both in aerodynamics and looks than earlier Fokkers, the arrival of the twin-engined low-wing Douglas DC-2 and DC-3 soon rendered it obsolete. Only one aircraft was built, and after service with KLM was sold to the Spanish Republican government to operate a liaison service between Madrid and Paris. The fate of the aircraft is not known.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -fokker-xx-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 06-15-2012 at 01:20 PM.

  7. #82
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    De Havilland DH-83 Fox Moth

    De Havilland designer A. E. Hagg evolved the de Havilland D.H.83 Fox Moth in 1932 to meet a perceived need for a light transport aircraft with good performance, economical operations and low initial cost. To standard Tiger Moth components (including wings, tail unit, landing gear and engine mounting) he added a new plywood-covered wooden fuselage, locating the pilot in an open cockpit behind an enclosed cabin which accommodated up to four passengers. The prototype, powered by an 89kW de Havilland Gipsy III engine, was flown at Stag Lane in March 1932. It was later shipped to Canada for trials on floats and skis, undertaken in service with Canadian Airways Ltd. Eight of the 98 British-built Fox Moths were exported to Canada between 1932 and 1935, and two more examples were built by de Havilland Aircraft of Australia. Many of these were powered by the Gipsy Major engine and some had sliding hoods over the cockpit. A single Japanese-built copy, powered by a 112kW radial engine and known as the Chidorigo, was flown by the Japanese Aerial Transport Company. After the war, in 1946, de Havilland Canada built 52 examples of the D.H.83C, which had a number of small improvements including trim tab on the elevators, an enlarged clear-view hood over the cockpit and the installation of a 108kW Gipsy Major 1C engine. Another example of the D.H.83C (there were no D.H.83A or D.H.83B variants) was completed by Leavens Bros Ltd in 1948.

    After the war, in Torrecica, where it was intended to link missions, was found in perfect condition the old EC-VVA, c / n 4087, which before the war had been equipped with floats and boarded to the ship "Artabro", for an scouting expedition to the Amazon River, and that the war finally frustrated. Of the six DH-83 acquired by the Republican goverment, only this one joined the Air Force as 30-147, later being given, the February 2, 1941, to Antonio Zúñiga Alvareda in compensation for his DH-83 EC-AVA, which had been requisitioned by the government. He received the civil registration EC-AEI, being low on February 25, 1973, some time after he left to fly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -de-havilland-dh-83-fox-moth-jpg   -avc_00256059-jpg  

    Last edited by gekho; 06-15-2012 at 05:39 PM.

  8. #83
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    Hanriot H-439

    The Hanriot H.43 was a military utility aircraft produced in France in the late 1920s and early 1930s which was primarily used by the Aéronautique Militaire as a trainer. While Hanriot had spent most of the 1920s manufacturing further and further developments of the HD.14 that had flown in 1920, the H.43 was an entirely new design. It was a conventional single-bay biplane with staggered wings of unequal span and a fuselage of fabric-covered metal tube. Accommodation for the pilot and passenger was in tandem, open cockpits and the main units of the fixed, tailskid undercarriage were linked by a cross-axle.

    Two prototypes in 1927 were followed by the LH.431 in 1928, a much-modified version that dispensed with the sweepback used on both the upper and lower wings of the H.43, had a new tail fin and added metal covering to the sides of the fuselage. This was ordered into production by the Aéronautique Militaire, which ordered 50 examples. These were slightly different again from the LH.431 prototype, having divided main undercarriage units, wings of slightly greater area, and redesigned interplane struts. Over the next six years, the Army would purchase nearly 150 examples for a variety of support roles including training, liaison, observation, and as an air ambulance. At the Fall of France in 1940, 75 of these aircraft remained in service. H.43 variants were also operated by civil flying schools in France, as well as 12 examples purchased for the military of Peru. The H-437 version was a trainning aircraft that flew for thr first time in 1933. Six of these prototypes were sold to the Spanish Republic and used as trainers until the end of the war.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -hanriot-439-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 06-15-2012 at 05:45 PM.

  9. #84
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    Hispano Suiza E-34

    The Hispano HS-43 was a Spanish single engine, tandem seat biplane, designed as a basic trainer. Twenty five were ordered by the Aeronáutica Naval but only five had been completed when the Spanish Civil War intervened. In 1934 the Aviación Militar called a competition for a Spanish designed and built basic trainer. Three companies responded, including La Hispana Suiza who had recently taken over the aircraft interests of La Hispana, which had been bought by Fiat. Their aircraft, the Hispano HS-34, is now sometimes referred to as the Hispano E-34, in the earlier company's style. The Hispano HS-34 was a single engine biplane, seating two in tandem. It had unswept single bay wings of the same span and constant chord, with some stagger. The wings were fabric covered wooden structures. Only the lower wing carried dihedral. The N-shaped interplane struts were assisted by flying wire bracing. The upper wing was supported over the fuselage by a pair of N-shaped struts to the upper fuselage longerons. The upper centre section had a large cut-out in its trailing edge for better upward visibility and also contained the fuel tank. Ailerons were fitted only on the lower wing. The HS-34 had its tailplane mounted on top of the fusealge, carrying split elevators. The rudder was horn balanced. The HS-34 had a rectangular cross section fuselage formed from steel tubing with internal wire bracing. Its cockpits were open. The undercarriage used a pair of internally sprung mainwheels with balloon tyres and a tailskid. A split axle was mounted on a short V-strut below the fuselage. On the prototype the undercarriage main legs were short, mounted on the lower fuselage longerons and assisted by short forward struts. The second prototype and production aircraft had longer legs fixed to the upper longerons. The prototype and production series aircraft were powered, as the rules of the competition required, by a 105 hp (78 kW) Walter Junior four cylinder inverted inline engine, though the second prototype was fitted with the more powerful 130 hp (97 kW) de Havilland Gipsy Major of the same configuration.

    The HS-34 did not win the Aviación Militar competition and was therefore not ordered by them but the Aeronáutica Naval placed an order for twenty five in August 1935. Only five had been built before the Spanish Civil War put a end to production of non-combat aircraft. In 1941, after the war a final HS-34 was assembled using recovered parts and a Gipsy engine. Hispano had hopes of restarting production, suggesting the HS-34 might find a rôle as a glider tug. A successful test took place on 18 April 1942, flown by the usual Hispano test pilot Fernando Floes Solis but the type was not accepted by the military. Instead, it flew with the civil Aero Club of Seville. Lage suggests that this aircraft may be the HS-41 referred to in the 1942 Hispano catalogue. The second prototype, with its Gipsy engine, new undercarriage and Handley Page slots was displayed before the war at the International Exposition held at Montjuich in 1935.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -hispano-suiza-34-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 09-12-2011 at 09:17 AM.

  10. #85
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    Potez Po-43

    The plane was a development of Potez 36. First of all it featured new, slimmer fuselage, with three seats, instead of two. A disadvantage were non-folding wings, with shorter slats. The original Potez 430 first flew in June 1932. It had 105 hp radial engine Potez 6Ас. 25 examples of this variant were completed, followed by other variants, differing with the last digit in designation. Other variants built in significant numbers were Potez 431 and Potez 438. 161 of Potez 43 family were built in total.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -po43-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 07-25-2012 at 12:20 PM.

  11. #86
    World Travelling Doctor? Gnomey's Avatar
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    Good shots!


    "Success is not Final, Failure is not Fatal, it is the Courage to Continue that Counts"
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  12. #87
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    Breguet 470 Fulgur

    In the early 1930s, the French company Breguet Aviation started design of a twin-engined transport aircraft, sharing the wing design with the Breguet 460 military multi-purpose aircraft and the Breguet 462 bomber, a mock-up of the initial design, designated Breguet 46T, was displayed at the 1934 Paris Air Show.[4] The new design, named Fulgur, and re-designated Breguet 470 T12 before the prototype was completed, was a low-winged monoplane of all-metal construction, accommodating 12 passengers. It had a retractable tailwheel undercarriage and was powered by two Gnome-Rhône 14K radial engines. The Fulgur made its first flight on 5 March 1936, its two powerful engines giving a maximum speed of 385 km/h (239 mph), leading it to be described as the fastest commercial transport in the world.

    The prototype Breguet 470 was entered in the 1936 Paris–Saigon–Paris race, with the hope of winning a large cash prize (1,800,000 Francs), and with a promise that the winner would be purchased by the French Air Ministry, setting out on 25 October, reaching India before having to withdraw due to a mechanical fault. It was re-engined with more powerful, 937 hp (699 kW) Gnome-Rhône 14N radials in 1937 before being entered into that year's Istres–Damascus–Paris race, finishing fifth in a time of 21 hours 3 min, with de-militarised Savoia-Marchetti SM.79s bombers occupying the first three places and a de Havilland Comet racer finishing fourth. No further production followed, and the prototype was sold to the Spanish Republican government at the time of the Spanish Civil War. It was painted dark green, but the paint peeled in many places giving the plane a scruffy look. The aircraft was used mainly for LAPE[8] flights between Barcelona and Toulouse, although the Spanish Republican Air Force occasionally used it as a military transport as well. It escaped to France following the surrender of the Spanish Republican Armed Forces, the aircraft then being scrapped.

    Source: Breguet 470 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -breguet-470-fulgur-jpg  
    Last edited by gekho; 01-06-2013 at 06:24 AM.

  13. #88
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    Mercenary Pilots: Harold Edward Dahl

    Harold Edward Dahl (29 June 1909 – 14 February 1956) was a mercenary American pilot who fought in the Spanish Republican Air Force during the Spanish Civil War. He was a member of the "American Patrol" of the Andres Garcia La Calle group. He was nicknamed "Whitey" due to his very blond hair. Born in Champaign, Illinois, he graduated from flying school at Kelly Field on 28 February 1933 and joined the U.S. Army Air Corps as a Second Lieutenant. His commission ended in 1936 due to gambling and subsequent court convictions. He then became a commercial pilot, but again gambling forced him to escape to Mexico. He was flying charter and cargo flights carrying material for the Second Spanish Republic, as Mexico was one of the very few distant countries to support the Spanish government. He was told about the good salary paid for mercenary pilots and so he joined Spain under the name of Hernando Diaz Evans, Evans being his mother's maiden name. He reported nine kills in this unit, though only five were ever confirmed.

    During the reorganization of the Fighter Squadrons in May 1937, Dahl was posted to a squadron with a large variety of nationalities. Frank Glasgow Tinker said that this made it very hard for a pilot to coordinate his place in the group during fighting. It seems that this was the case on June 13 of that year, where he was surprised by enemy planes and was shot down and taken prisoner. Initially sentenced to death, there were some diplomatic movements to free him. His first wife Edith Rogers, a known singer of impressive beauty, was said to have visited Francisco Franco himself to plead for his life. This story later became the basis of the 1940 movie Arise, My Love. He stayed in prison until 1940 and then returned to the U.S. After he and Edith Rogers divorced, he accepted another mercenary job, this time with the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and served during World War II where he trained RCAF pilots for combat in Europe at an airfield near Belleville, Ontario. It was here that he met his second wife Eleanor Bowne, the daughter of the richest man in Belleville. After the war, he was accused of stealing equipment from the air force that had been decommissioned.

    Around 1951, he joined Swissair and stayed in Switzerland but in 1953 he was caught smuggling gold with his girlfriend and was expelled from the country, an event that compelled his second wife to divorce him. Back in Canada, he became a cargo pilot flying DC-3s when on 14 February 1956 he was killed during a crash in bad weather.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -harold-evans-dahl-jpg  

  14. #89
    World Travelling Doctor? Gnomey's Avatar
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    Nice stuff!


    "Success is not Final, Failure is not Fatal, it is the Courage to Continue that Counts"
    Sir Winston Churchill

    "To him the People of the World Largely owe the Freedom and Liberties they Enjoy Today"
    Enscription on Hugh Dowding's (AOC Fighter Command 1936-40) statue in London


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    Thank u for sharing Moscas and other Republican airplanes.

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